Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec was among the most famous artists to create lithographs. As a leader in taking an innovative approach to this medium, he composed with broad, flat areas of color and curvilinear lines that enliven the scenes. Lautrec patronized the cabarets and dance halls he depicted, illustrating popular performers and nightlife in Paris in the 1890s.

Ukiyo-e prints were made by artists in Japan during the Edo Period (1615–1868) and depict scenes of daily activities and entertainments. They were widely collected in Japan, and by western artists such as Toulouse-Lautrec in the 19th century. The subjects, vivid colors and patterns, cropped forms, and compressed illusion of space inspired these artists to feature these characteristics in their own work.

These prints were amid the artistic context Gari Melchers encountered in Paris in the 1890s. See how his works of art show similar elements of color, pattern, composition and bold expression.